Maria Kossman is a creative writer, essayist and blogger based in Edmonton, Canada. Passionate about sustainable living, minimalism, travelling, and anything antique, she focuses on advocating life that is inspiring, mindful and elegant. Her writing appeared in such magazines as NUVO, LUXIDERS, and THE ISSUE. At this stage, she is engaged in creating a collection of short stories, studying writing at the University of Alberta and, becoming a part of the editing team of an online Literary Journal of Poetry, Fiction, Non-Fiction & Art Lemonspouting.

Can Minimalism Transcend Its Own Trendiness?

Written for NUVO Magazine.

Is minimalism a deep-seated philosophy, capable of changing the way we view our world? Or is it just a trend that uses the same old social markers to separate people through material possessions? To be a minimalist, do you have to declare it? All are questions worth asking in an age where personal philosophy is often defined by the contents of the closet and not the mind. Observing the whole movement, its trendiness in the modern world, minimalism appears as a combination of actions focused on simplifying, where quality experiences matter more than material possessions.

Talent And Genuine Desire Of The Heart

One of my favourite Russian authors, Anton Chekhov, had a brother, a quite talented artist whose natural inclinations were towards alcohol rather than the hard work of painting. Despite convincing attempts of the family to return the lost son to the right way, he ended up in a very deplorable condition. Now, every time I read one of Anton Chekhov’s letters to his brother, I can not help but repeat along with him that owning talent only does not bring prosperity. Same as having continuous luck wouldn't mean its ending without perseverance and commitment to the craft. The whole idea of talents is overrated if it is not supported by certain continuous actions that allow healthy growth.

 

The Art Of Finding, Reusing And Restyling Vintage Furniture

Written for LUXIDERS Magazine.

Addressing the issue of mass production, mindless consuming, and suggesting ideas of second-hand or vintage shopping, be it for home decor or closet, we get two groups of people; the first one denies the idea of sitting on the already used sofa, while the second group supports such sustainable action with both hands down.

 It is not that we are going to discuss, whether the latter group is fully responsible and conscious of their choices. Instead, the main purpose that stands behind educating yourself on the impact production have on the environment might and should affect those choices.